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Archive for the ‘Questions…and answers’ Category

You asked. Dr. Barb answered.I’m not sure which “tightening product” you’ve seen. The only way to tighten the vagina is to tighten the surrounding muscles. Kegel exercises (we give instructions on our website) target the muscles of the pelvic floor. And many women find that exercise tools (like vaginal weights or a barbell) helps them be sure they’re flexing the right muscles. I also recommend the Intensity Pelvic Tone Vibrator, which uses a combination of electrical pulses and vibration to build pelvic tone.

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You asked. Dr. Barb answered.The sexual arousal creams and gels are effective, and beneficial to most women who use them. Like our category of “warming lubricants and oils,” they typically use an ingredient like menthol, mint, or pepper to stimulate circulation, which increases responsiveness during intimacy. Read the instructions for the product you intend to use, to be sure you understand whether it’s for internal or only external use; lubricants are generally safe for internal tissues.

Arousal and warming products have the potential to cause some irritation for those women with significant atrophy, or thinning of the vulvovaginal tissues. I recommend applying a small amount to the genitals in advance of sex to make sure it’s comfortable and pleasurable.

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You asked. Dr. Barb answered.Intrarosa is a new product for treating vaginal atrophy, approved by the FDA in November of 2016. It will be available by prescription only; it’s not yet in pharmacies but is likely to be later in 2017. The clinical trials for Intrarosa are favorable for treating vaginal atrophy, or genitourinary syndrome of menopause causing painful intercourse. It is an adrenal hormone, prasterone (dehydroepiandrosterone), formulated as a once-a-day vaginal insert.

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MonaLisa Touch is a laser treatment for vaginal atrophy, also known as genitourinary syndrome of menopause. I explained the treatment option in a blog post a few months ago.

You asked. Dr. Barb answered.The treatment is quite effective for most patients, but it is costly. As a new procedure, it’s not covered by most insurance companies; without insurance coverage the expense (cost varies by region, but figure $1,500 to $2,000 for the three required treatments) is a limitation for many. The procedure needs to be updated regularly, probably about once a year for most women.

We also lack long-term data on its efficacy and side effects. We are very hopeful the clinical trials will soon be available to assure its effectiveness and safety.

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You can’t really tighten your vagina. What you can do is tighten your pelvic floor muscles, which surround the vagina. We offer a variety of products designed to help you improve pelvic floor tone, as well as instructions on how to do Kegel exercises.

There are some laser treatments that have been offered to tighten the vagina. They’re relatively new treatment options, and the outcomes seem quite variable.

Strengthen your floor!I hope this helps! (And I’ll note that strengthening your pelvic floor is also good for preventing incontinence, so there’s lots of reason to develop the Kegel habit!)

 

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You say you reached menopause (one year without a period) six years ago. Sex has become painful, and you want to “get it back.”

You asked. Dr. Barb answered.It’s never too late! Using a vaginal moisturizer may be of some benefit, but if you’ve had pain for several years, you may need a prescription treatment option to restore comfort. There are localized estrogens and Osphena (a non-hormonal option) that are very effective at restoring vaginal health. I have a patient who had not had intercourse in over 25 years. Within 3 months of treatment she was able to resume–and enjoy–intercourse! It is absolutely possible.

I would recommend going to a physician/provider who can do a careful exam and confirm the cause of the pain. Atrophy is the most common reason for painful intercourse after menopause, but there can be other causes as well; identifying the right cause makes all the difference to effective treatment.

With effort and follow-through it is nearly always possible to successfully restore the ability to have intercourse.

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You describe having been on bioidentical hormones for a number of years, as well as having had a complete hysterectomy. There are a number of variables that contribute to this mystery.

You asked. Dr. Barb answered.A couple of thoughts: Are you using testosterone with your hormone therapy? The ability to arouse and orgasm, as well as drive, is influenced by testosterone for some women. Not all women get an improvement in sexual function with the use of testosterone. If you aren’t using testosterone, you may want to have a conversation with your provider about adding it. Virtually all women over 50 have low testosterone, and having ovaries removed is a big factor in low testosterone.

Second, are you using compounded hormone therapy (HT)? I see so much variation in the dosing and absorption of compounded HT that I almost always recommend a pharmaceutical bioidentical HT. I just see so much more consistency in symptom relief.

There is also a relatively new supplement, called Stronvivo, that I have had some great successes with women. They’ve used it–and it’s been tested–for improved sex drive, lubrication, and more. A neuropsychiatrist in my community is recommending Stronvivo for improved memory, too!)

And there’s one more newer product, the Fiera arouser, that’s been very helpful for many women with arousal (and orgasm). It’s promoted as helpful for “before play,” increasing circulation and lubrication.

I hope some combination of these suggestions solves your mystery!

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